Long Exposure Photographs

During the Spring of 2009, I began working on long exposure photographs. I harnessed the camera's ability to collapse time, creating a series of long exposures of landscapes as I rode in a car. With this work, I considered the differences between timing a day by the rhythm between cyclical, natural events such as sunrise and sunset; and mechanical time, which measures time evenly, independently of natural occurrences. I capture an event marking cyclical time using a mechanically timed device (the camera), creating a bridge between the two forms of experience.

I also created long exposure photographs of people. I show people photographed in in-between moments that would normally not recorded by the subject of my photographs. In my work, a long exposure causes trails of light following the people in the photographs as they moved while the shutter remained open. The people cannot be readily discerned or identified. The photographs show that as we try to nail down and truly remember each moment, it passes immediately.

I also created long exposure photographs of antique snapshots purchased at a thrift store. My movement of the camera, and the corresponding light trails past each photograph, draw attention to the change to the owners' memory of the photographed events that had occurred since the snapshots were taken. The snapshots were discarded by their owners, forgotten and devalued. Still, these moments were once commemorated by the people who originally photographed them. My work obscures these moments as a way to show the impermanence and inaccuracy of photography as an aid to our memory, or an accurate commemoration of a moment in time.

 

 

Long Exposure

Long Exposure

Long Exposure

Long Exposure

Long Exposure

Long Exposure

Long Exposure

Long Exposure

Long Exposure

Long Exposure

Long Exposure

Long Exposure

 

 

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